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A main contributor to this difference is the challenge
of developing HRSs. While investing in HRSs in early stages of development
carries high risk because of the low number of FCVs using a HRS infrastructure, the deployment of FCVs is
delayed if not enough HRSs are available to support refueling of those
vehicles. This issue shows the importance of governments focusing on
incentivizing HRS and decreasing their investment risk.

Based on the
characteristics of technologies of BEVs, PHEVs, and FCVs it was concluded that
although these technologies may be known as competitive technologies right now, they can also be
regarded as complementary technologies. This
means that a mixed fleet of BEVs and FCVs will put a lighter burden on a country/jurisdiction to decarbonize
transportation in the long term compared to a case that all vehicles use the
same technology.

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United
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United States Department of
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vehicles across countries. Sustainability, 6(11),
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Harrison, G., & Thiel,
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competition and sensitivity to infrastructure in Europe. Technological
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Jin, L., Searle, S., &
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incentives. The International Council on Clean Transportation.

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1477-1489.

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Sierzchula, W., Bakker, S.,
Maat, K., & van Wee, B. (2014). The influence of financial incentives and
other socio-economic factors on electric vehicle adoption. Energy
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Jin, L., Searle, S., &
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